ANTHROPOLOGY Courses

ANTHROPOLOGY Courses


AN–101 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL/SPRING/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

This course is an introduction to anthropology: the comparative study of human beings. The basic principles of archaeology, cultural anthropology, linguistics and physical anthropology are explored as they relate to the study of human beings, and to each other as sub disciplines of anthropology.

 

AN–203 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY
FALL ONLY/ODD YEARS

3 credit hours

This course presents a broad overview of the practice and principles of archaeology introducing regional, maritime, and international approaches. The course covers locating sites, site surveying, mapping, sampling, excavation, and the recording of cultural remains, alongside contemporary issues in cultural resource management. In-class learning is supplemented with intensive field course preparation and participation.

 

AN–212 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL ONLY/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

This course involves the study of culture, the central concept of anthropology. Traditional and contemporary theories regarding the nature, structure and dynamics of culture are examined, as well as human social institutions: marriage and the family, kinship and descent, social organization, subsistence patterns, economic systems, political organization, social control, religion and magic and the arts.

 

AN–222 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
AS REQUIRED/AS REQUIRED

4 credit hours

(As Resources Permit) This course surveys the subfield of modern Biological (Physical) Anthropology, with a focus on the study and interpretation of human and non-human primate evolution, contemporary human biological diversity, and the bicultural, ecological and historical dynamics of selective factors including diseases that have impacted - and continue to impact on - the human condition. A three-hour weekly lab is required.

 

AN–234 LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL ONLY/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

This course presents linguistic questions, methods, and tools used within anthropology with special attention to the relation between Oceanic language and culture. Participants will develop an introductory understanding of the profound implications that language has for the formation maintenance and change of cultural practices and social events.

 

AN–320 PEOPLE OF THE PACIFIC
SPRING ONLY/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

AN320 is a study of the cultural anthropology of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia, the most ethnographically diverse region on the planet. Themes may include art, colonialism, ethnocentrism, first contact, gender, inequality, intoxication, power, race relations, religion, ritual, social change, sorcery and tattooing.

 

AN–321 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING ONLY/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

Visual Anthropology combines filmic theory and practice towards new understandings of cultural anthropology and contemporary society. This course offers undergraduates an opportunity to creatively engage in the direction and production of ethnographic films regarding issues affecting themselves and their community.

 

AN–333 LITERATURE OF GUAM, MICRONESIA, AND THE PACIFIC
FALL ONLY/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

This course provides an overview of the Pacific island literatures. It surveys myths, legends, folktales, historical and literary works of Guam, Micronesia and other Pacific island cultures. It also explores resources suitable for instruction in the schools.

 

AN–341 CULTURAL ECOLOGY
FALL ONLY/ODD YEARS

3 credit hours

This course examines the linkages and interactions between human cultures and the environment, particularly of subsistence peoples in the tropics and the Pacific. Traditional and contemporary theories and approaches of human adaptation to and modification of the environment are examined.

 

AN–344 AGING: MYTH AND REALITIES
FALL ONLY/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

This course explores the major issues and concepts pertinent to gerontology, the study of the aging process. The prevailing theories of the social/biological aging process, and the economics, physical and psychological problems that might arise in late life are presented, and students learn how these factors impinge on the well- being of the older person and the social structure of a community. Aging as it occurs in different societies and throughout history is discussed. Social myths and stereotypes are explored. An overview of existing aging policies and special programs for seniors is included, as is a section on dying, death and grieving.

 

AN–369 SPECIAL TOPICS
FALL/SPRING/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

This course provides students with advanced study of specific topics within the field of anthropology. The course may be repeated for credit when different topics are covered.

 

AN–381 ASIA-PACIFIC MARITIME ARCHAEOLOGY
SPRING ONLY/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the distinctive maritime heritage of the Asia-Pacific region as an example of the world's maritime archaeology to illustrate past and contemporary connections that communities have with the ocean and its resources.

 

AN–413 RESEARCH METHODS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL ONLY/ALL YEARS

3 credit hours

This course covers the use of bibliography, reference tools, and research methods in Anthropology. Presentation and cooperative evaluation of research materials, methods, and projects is required. Course may not be repeated for credit.

 

AN–421 CRS-CUL SOC PBLM GU & MICRO
SPRING ONLY/ODD YEARS

3 credit hours

This course analyzes and evaluates the changing cultural patterns of Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, the Republic of Belau, the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. New techniques and materials in the social science area pertaining to cross-cultural understanding are considered.

 

AN–462 ADVANCED FIELD METHODS IN ARCHAEOLOGY
AS REQUIRED/AS REQUIRED

3 - 6 credit hours

As Resources Permit This course offers advanced training of archaeological field methodology for advanced students who already have prior knowledge of archaeological field methods. In addition to focusing on aspects of research design, advanced recovery techniques and data collation and processing, students will develop on-site decision-making and problem-solving skills. This course aims to train advanced students to a level where they can direct archaeological excavation with supervision. Can be repeated once for credit, if field project is different.

 

AN–498 INTERNSHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL/SPRING/ALL YEARS

4 credit hours

This course is designed to introduce students to the application and relevance of anthropology in the workplace, and is suitable for anthropology students of junior or senior standing. Placement with an appropriate host organization will be coordinated in association with the student's advisor. The student works a designated number of hours over the course of the semester, and holds regular meetings with the appropriate instructor. A final assignment will draw upon the knowledge and skills gained during the period of the internship. Can be retaken for credit if content is different.